Children of Children

Author’s note: This tune was inspired by the song “It Hurts To Face Reality” by Lefty Frizzell, from the movie Tender Mercies, one of my favorites – Robert Duvall, displaying his amazing talents, which won him the Best Actor Academy Award for 1983. My song is slow, traditional country, with (I imagine) steel accompaniment. A.S.  

 

MOMMA had, a little girl, when she was, a little girl.

And it made for an interesting tale.

As Daddy learned, to make a buck, I came along, to join the fun.

A humble house, a special time, a growing love.

 

Chorus:

We were the children of children, you could see it in their eyes.

They learned it as they went along, though they never compromised.

We never wanted nothing, and we always felt their love.

We were the children of children, growing older, growing up.

 

Sometimes Dad, he worked the night shift, back when I was in grammar school.

I’d come home for lunch on my Stingray, we’d shoot baskets in the afternoon.

And Sis she was a beauty, no one smarter or aware.

Raised by the hands of two young lovers more determined than they were scared.

 

Chorus:

We were the children of children, the pictures they don’t lie.

They learned it as they went along, though they never compromised.

We never wanted nothing, and we always felt their love.

We were the children of children, growing older, growing up.

 

Bridge:

And Sis she would turn fifty today, if all was right with life.

But the Lord took her home at thirty-nine, and you know that don’t seem right.

And Momma and Daddy grow old together, though it’s rare that people do.

And the river may rise like tears in your eyes, but they’re determined to see it through.

 

Repeat chorus:

We were the children of children, you could see it in their eyes.

They learned it as they went along, though they never compromised.

We never wanted nothing, and we always felt their love.

We were the children of children, growing older, growing up.

 

 

 

© 2012 Andrew Spradling

First published Shelton College Quarterly

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7 thoughts on “Children of Children

    1. I agree. I liked Crazy Heart too though. I liked Robert Duvall’s involvement in both, as much as a producer as actor. I love movies that give glimpses of the way characters write. Finding Forrester is another.

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      1. I though the baptism scene in Tender Mercies was very affecting. Nothing fancy, just how it is. Loved how the kid asked Mac if he felt any different after being baptized and he said that he didn’t yet. Loved how he recounted how he drove around that one night he left her and started out back onto the road, but kept coming back. Loved the way she explaijned to the daughter (Ellen Barkin) how Mac stopped drinking. All of it resonated with me. All seemed real – like the way real people talk and act. Loved the way at the end they are happy and settled, but Mac still wrestles with the mystery of grace. Great movie.

        BTW I agree with Joe. It’s a good song.

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      2. I think my favorite part was the uncertainty of his and the daughter’s previous relationship. She says you haven’t spoken my name and asks if he remembers it (as if a father wouldn’t). But he said that he always called her sister. But even more, when she asks about the song he used to sing (on the wings of a snow white dove) and he says he doesn’t remember that. But then sings it after she leaves (and also genius to me that they just show him singing it from behind, looking out the window.) it raises so many questions: did he not want to sing it now because he thinks he has no voice? did he just not want to open up to her? It would have been such a connection for them.

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  1. That scene where Mac tells his daughter that he doesn’t remember the song he used to sing to her has always puzzled me, too. His concious refusal to comfort her seems cruel and whatever else Mac Sledge might have been, he was not – it seemed to me, at least – cruel. Why did he refuse? Could it be that he could not bring himself to do it because he would have fallen apart? I don’t know. But I do like these bits of a work that leave you stunned and guessing; that leave someting mysterious and unresolved. That’s like real life. Like real people.

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